Whether it’s copywriting or roofing marketing, the best business model in the world is nothing without the motivated workers who make it a reality.

Are you motivated by your work? Are your employees? If you are a manager wondering what your options are to increase employee productivity, check out the 10 proven strategies listed below that should be implemented in your workplace…

1: Share the Big Picture

Be a communicator. No one likes being left in the dark, so honor your employees by revealing what part they play in the Big Picture.

2: Be a Positive Guide

Blue collar workers are notoriously under the impression that tough guys get the job done.

However – negativity does not increase productivity or employee loyalty. Want to see willing workers who put their shoulder to the plow? Cut out the negative jabs and replacing them with positive, constructive criticism.

3: Offer Incentives (and honor them!)

Whether you are the owner of a company or a manager, there are always incentives that you can offer to your workers.

Example: There was a foreman in the mining industry who would point out a project to his team and tell them “When X, Y, and Z is done, you can go home.”  The results? His team’s productivity increased exponentially.  Sometimes the men would get off early. Sometimes they would work overtime.  But they were always motivated. The wise leader was rewarded by having the highest level of productivity of any foreman at that location.

This should go without saying, but incentives must be accompanied by a follow-through. The moment your workers sense that you are false to your word, you have deservedly lost their respect.

4: Be the Worker You Wish Your Employee Would Be

I had a manager who was a super accomplished delegator. If you asked him a question, he would pass it off to someone else.  The first time he did it was funny. Every single time after that was maddening. Eventually, his best workers quit.

Be the boss who is willing to roll his sleeves up and dive in, taking a bit of the workload off someone else’s shoulders.

5: Set Reasonable Expectations

Begin with reasonable, smaller goals that can be easily accomplished to boost your staff’s morale and confidence.

6: Be a Real Person

Yes, we are all so burdened by our own lives.

Trust me: you have time to ask about how your employees are doing. Ask about their homes, their families, their health.  It will make all the world of difference – they may even look forward to the support they receive from their boss.

7: Encourage Generosity

If you would like a work space where people contribute honestly and generously, be willing to go the extra mile as well. Let them off early on a Friday afternoon, if you have that liberty.  Take time to buy lunch or a round of drinks.

8: Say Thank You

At the end of a difficult, frustrating day on the job, take the moment to look your employees in the eye and say a sincere “thank you.” They’ll think about it the whole drive home, and look back with pride on their work day.

9: Ask for Feedback

Ask them why they work for you. What keeps them motivated? What do they enjoy about their job? What could be fixed – and do they have suggestions on how to fix it?

10: Be a Team

Promote a team mentality among your workers. Set goals. Be positive. Honor your incentives. Insist that your team treats every member with respect and dignity. Take time for positive support so that each project you take on is one that will promote the success and healthy pride of every member of the team – showcasing the company that they work for.


It takes time and effort to develop the skills of a great leader. But every boss, manager, and foreman should be focused on this goal.  Without it, your employees will not have the environment they need to be optimistic, productive, and hardworking.

(And now, I’m back to my roofing marketing – check out the cool Roofing Contractor’s Guide to Marketing download below to see what our team at Art Unlimited works on to stay motivated!)

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